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#R3726
The Mystery Reaction: A Lesson on Chemical Reactions

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Portable Document Format
APS
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Description This teaching resource was developed by a K-12 science teacher in the American Physiologycal Society's 2006 Frontiers in Physiology Program. For more information on this program, please visit www.frontiersinphys.org. The purpose of this lesson is to design an investigation and conduct an experiment that will allow students to explore the differences between physical and chemical changes. In this investigation, they are given the opportunity to develop a list of evidence for determining whether or not a chemical change has occurred.
Type of Resource Laboratory or Hands-On Activity
Format Portable Document Format - PDF
Author
Tonya Williams, Kelly Miller Middle School
Development Date August 1, 2006
Grade/Age Level Middle School (Grades 6-8)
Pedagogies
National Science
Educational Standard
Evidence, models, and explanation (K-12)
Learning Time 2-3 hours
Language English
Type of Review Reviewed By LifeSciTRC Board
Review Date December 6, 2010
Keywords
Suggested Use

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Rather than depending completely upon non-specific measurements, a thermometer could also be used by simply placing the baggie over the thermometer to record actual temperature changes. This would provide some numbers that could be analyzed/discussed. The rubrics are appropriate and helpful.
Dexter Speck, University of Kentucky